ATTENTION!

The State Theatre Box Office will be CLOSED Friday October 17th through Thursday October 23rd for renovations. A temporary Box Office will be available in the State Theatre Lobby at 107 West State Street Tuesday - Thursday 10am-5pm.

Tickets for ALL SHOWS can be purchase online 24/7!

Oct 25

Doors open at 1:00 pm Starts at 2:00 pm All ages

Price: $10-$15

Event Information

Fall Children’s Show
October 25th
Alice in Wonderland and Pied Piper of Hamelin
2pm matinee
7 pm evening performance

Alice in Wonderland
Music from Le Tombeau de Couperin by Maurice Ravel
Choreography by Alice Reid
The tale and her adventures in Wonderland featuring favorite characters like The Mad Hatter, Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum, and the Cheshire Cat.

The Pied Piper of Hamelin is a colorful ballet featuring an evocative score by Edvard Grieg, including the haunting "Hall of The Mountain King”

While Pied Piper is timely for Halloween (children as well as rats are led away from their village), artistic elements, including the unforgettable backdrop by Alice Reid, the comic relief provided by the clownish Mayor and his two clumsy sidekicks, and the virtuoso dancing displayed by the Gypsies, Townspeople and the Pied Piper himself, reassuringly demonstrate that this is all make-believe.

Oct 25

Doors open at 6:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $10-$15

Event Information

Fall Children’s Show
October 25th
Alice in Wonderland and Pied Piper of Hamelin
2pm matinee
7 pm evening performance

Alice in Wonderland
Music from Le Tombeau de Couperin by Maurice Ravel
Choreography by Alice Reid
The tale and her adventures in Wonderland featuring favorite characters like The Mad Hatter, Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum, and the Cheshire Cat.

The Pied Piper of Hamelin is a colorful ballet featuring an evocative score by Edvard Grieg, including the haunting "Hall of The Mountain King”

While Pied Piper is timely for Halloween (children as well as rats are led away from their village), artistic elements, including the unforgettable backdrop by Alice Reid, the comic relief provided by the clownish Mayor and his two clumsy sidekicks, and the virtuoso dancing displayed by the Gypsies, Townspeople and the Pied Piper himself, reassuringly demonstrate that this is all make-believe.

With special introduction by David Borden - Film Composer for the Exorcist, Moog Musician and Cornell Professor. Brought to you by The History Center in Tompkins County and The Bob Moog Foundation. Movie starts at 8pm. Rate R, Ages 17+.

Oct 30

Oct 30

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm Ages 17+ Only

Price: $5-$6

Event Information

Something beyond evil is happening in a little girl's room. Regan has brutally changed both in the way she looks and the way she acts, with violent outbursts on everyone who comes in contact with her. Her worried mother gets in contact with a priest who comes to the conclusion that Regan is possessed. The top priest who can deal with an exorcism, Father Merrin, is called in to help save Regan from the demon inside her.

Eclectic though traditionally minded country band that looks to everything from Tex-Mex to rockabilly to classic pop to get their sound. All ages. Show starts at 8pm.

Nov 2

Nov 2

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $35-$45

Event Information

Eclectic though traditionally minded country band that looks to everything from Tex-Mex to rockabilly to classic pop to get their sound.

Beninese singer whose Fon-language dance music and percussive rhythms earned her acclaim beyond her homeland.

Nov 7

Nov 7

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $24.50-$36.50

Event Information

Angelique Kidjo digs into her roots with her new Razor & Tie release, OYO. Roots that reach far beyond her West African homeland of Benin, because Grammy Award winning singer, dancer and songwriter Kidjo is a definitive 21st century world artist. Her art roves across boundaries, genres and ethnicities, finding the connections that link musical forms from every part of the world, while still bonding closely with her own traditions.

with Girlpool

Singer/songwriter and head of Rilo Kiley whose folk-country-rock solo concoctions recall Emmylou Harris. **NOTE: All Orchestra seating is general admission. If you want reserved seating please choose Loge or Upper Balcony seating.**

Nov 8

Nov 8

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $25

Event Information

Jenny Lewis returns with her new album, The Voyager, on July 29th. The Los Angeles artist’s first solo LP since 2008’s Acid Tongue, The Voyager is Lewis’s most deeply personal, and her most musically robust. Featuring production work from Ryan Adams, Beck, as well as Lewis and her longtime collaborator Johnathan Rice, The Voyager finds Lewis at her sharp-witted best, singing about her recent life with honesty and incisiveness. And then there’s her voice, which was already a force to be reckoned with, but sounds even richer, more nuanced, more powerful. Lewis says The Voyager was the hardest album she has ever made, documenting her struggle to cope following the death of her estranged father in 2010 and the subsequent break-up of her band, Rilo Kiley. In the three years she worked on it, there were moments she thought she’d never finish. But, more than ever before, she knew she had to. The story is best told in Lewis’s own words:
Making The Voyager got me through one of the most difficult periods of my life. After Rilo Kiley broke up and a few really intense personal things happened, I completely melted down. It nearly destroyed me. I had such severe insomnia that, at one point, I didn’t sleep for 5 straight nights. Many of the songs on The Voyager came out of the need to occupy my mind in the moments when I just couldn’t shut down.
I asked for help from a lot of places. The first song on the album, “Head Under Water,” is about some of that. I really did get hypnotized. I tried everything. I got acupuncture. I did neurofeedback. I did massage therapy. I looked in the phonebook for a healer in Studio City and I met this woman who barely touched me for an hour and then wrote on index cards about what I was going through. All this just to try and get to sleep! I was ready to call the psychic hotline, “Tell me when this fucking thing is gonna be over.”
I recorded through my father’s death and terrible insomnia and all of the related fall-out. I just kept recording. Some of it was good and some of it wasn’t, but it took my mind off what was going on. Over the course of a couple years, I recorded dozens of demos, often trying multiple versions of the same song. I knew I had to finish it. And every single one of my friends helped me get there. This record took an entire village of musicians, including Ryan Adams, Beck, Johnathan Rice, Farmer Dave Scher, Blake Mills, Benmont Tench, Jason Boesel, Nathaniel Walcott, Alex Greenwald, Lou Barlow, First Aid Kit, the Watson Twins, Z. Berg, and Becky Stark, among others.
“Just One Of The Guys” was one of the tunes I’d tried a few different ways before I finally recorded it with Beck, at his home studio in Malibu. He ended up producing the song and contributing backing vocals. The whole experience was super laid-back — walking on the beach, talking about movies and the Rolling Stones and French pop music. It was just very mellow and lovely. But that was on the eve of my meltdown, and I didn’t go back again for a year.
I took a break from recording last spring and summer to tour with The Postal Service, for the tenth anniversary of our album, Give Up. It felt so good to play those songs. Every night I got crazy chills. I’d look down and the hair on my arm would be standing on end during “The District Sleeps Alone Tonight.” After having been a front-person for most of my career, it was an amazing time to just be there on the side, to support Ben and Jimmy. It was a great path back to myself, in a way. But the whole time I was out there, I was thinking, “This is wonderful, but I need to be playing my songs. I need to finish up this album once and for all.”
I was searching for a spirit guide. With everything that was going on in my life these past few years, I wanted to try ceding control. It can be a relief, at a certain point in your creative life. You let in a bit of criticism and it frees you up. And Ryan Adams and his partner Mike Viola were the final piece of the puzzle. Ryan and I didn’t know each other very well before this album — we had hardly even listened to one another’s music, to be honest. But I’d heard he built this awesome studio, Pax Am, at Sunset Sound, so I hit him up and asked if I could come in and record something. We put together a band — Ryan on guitar, Griffin Goldsmith from Dawes on drums, Gus Seyffert on bass, Mike on guitar and piano — and booked time for the very next day after I got back from the Postal Service tour.
I had this song, “She’s Not Me,” and I wasn’t really happy with any of the versions of it I’d tried. We ended up doing it in a different key, with a different tempo, with a part cut out. The biggest change was doing it live. There’s just something palpable about a group of people playing music live in a room together. The session was so fluid: I taught the band the changes, we did two takes, and that was it. I thought, “Well, that was awesome,” but Ryan wouldn’t let us listen back to it. The entire two weeks we were in the studio, we never listened to playback of anything, we just moved onto the next song.
Some of his methods infuriated me at the time, but I thrive in that environment — having some conflict to resolve, or having to prove myself. I was showing Ryan that I had something to say, and he knew how to annoy me into that perfect spot. We would get into these philosophical arguments about how to make records. Every time I wanted to put a harmony on a song, Ryan would ask me, “Do you come from a musical theater background?” His argument was that great songs, with great stories, don’t need background vocals. He would say, “Morrissey doesn’t use background vocals.” And I would yell: “Well, I do!”
I trusted the vision, and Ryan ended up being the person to get me over the fear of finishing something I’d been working on for so long. He found me when I was in a weird, tough spot, and he really helped me. And then we got to know each other as friends: You’re singing these songs and you’re weeping in front of your new bro who’s producing your record, and it’s heavy.
While I was in it, I couldn’t see my way out. But eventually, I started feeling better and the insomnia passed. I can sleep again, but I’m certainly a different person now. This record was the hardest one I’ve ever made. I truly thought I was never going to finish it, but I did. The Voyager tells that story: the longest night of my life and the journey to finally getting some rest.

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107 West State Street
(607) 277-8283
Ithaca, NY 14850

Box Office Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 11am-4pm

On show days the Box Office will be open 2 hours before advertised door time in addition to our normal hours.

State Theatre of Ithaca Inc. is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization that owns and operates Tompkins County’s last remaining historic theatre. Our mission is to enhance the cultural life of Ithaca and the Finger Lakes by preserving, operating and promoting the historic State Theatre as an active venue for national, international and community performances and programming.